CIVIL RESISTANCE


CIVIC EDUCATION   . . .

Where I go for AGGREGATED news on Cambodia, plus...   . . .           On Dec 26-29, 1979 [by now, Cambodia under one full year of Vietnamese occupation], the musician Paul McCartney and Kurt Waldheim, the Secre [ ... ]


CIVIC EDUCATION


Has Science Discovered God?     Click to watch this FASCINATING, MIND-BLOGGING video with breathtaking images and you learn science in the process!   Read transcript             God in the Cosmos
Veritas Forum at Yale University  [ ... ]



A little bit of glamour to break the dark topic of ECCC 003


The shot, taken by famed photographer Annie Leibovitz, finds a barefoot, makeup-free Jolie sitting on a wooden boat in Cambodia's Siem Reap province, 2011.

. . . . .

 

Red Wedding, 2 June 2011

Red Wedding, 2 June 2011

 

. . . . .

 

The Negotiating History of the ECCC's Personal Jurisdiction

by Frmr. US War Crimes Ambassador, Prof. David Scheffer, 22 May 2011

In Cambodia Tribunal Monitor, in KI-Media

Theary Seng, Prof. David Scheffer, 2009
Theary Seng, Ambassador David Scheffer, ECCC Duch Closing Arguments, 2009

 

. . . . .

 

A temporary break from KRT Cases 003/04

Video Interview of Theary Seng '00: South Africa Externship

University of Michigan Law School Video

Filmed on 11 January 2011, Law Quad

. . . . .

 

Sacrava, Case 003, 23 May 2011

In KI-Media

 

Appeal planned by KRT prosecutor, 23 May 2011
Read enlarged and other articles . . .

. . . . .

 

Overflowing crowd at Meta House for

Cambodia premier of FACING GENOCIDE

an award-winning documentary film by David Aronowitsch and Staffan Lindberg of Story Productions (Sweden), 18 May 2011

Theary Seng, National Radio, 18 May 2011
Theary Seng after the film premier and Q&A of Facing Genocide (NR photo, 18 May 2011)

 

D. J. Ken - National Radio Text Service

In KI-Media

While sleeping with her mother four year old Theary Seng's awakened and her eyes locked on to the eyes of the Khmer Rouge soldiers as they entered the room with wet ropes and then they left. Her mother knew exactly what the wet ropes meant. When she awakened her mother was gone. At first she didn't think that was unusual since the adults left early to go to work. In this case that wasn't the reality - Red Light and Virginity Trade to be Screened at the Meta House Phnom Penh, Cambodia Wednesday, May 18, 2011

 

TRAGEDIES CAUGHT ON FILM

Theary Seng lived through a nightmare after she was taken away to a prison camp at the age of four with her mother and her four brothers. She recounted the experience to an overflow crowd that came to see the film "Facing Genocide" at the Meta House tonight Wednesday, May 18.


Seng recalled that while she was sleeping with her mother her eyes opened as she saw Khmer Rouge soldiers carrying wet ropes walk into the room where the family was sleeping. Her eyes locked on to the soldiers eyes and they left. Her mother knew exactly what the wet ropes meant. When she awakened her mother was gone. At first she didn't think that was unusual since the adults left early to go to work. In this case that wasn't the reality as Seng later found that the KR murdered her mother as they did her father. She and her brothers were orphans.


The film focuses on the emergence of the Khmer Rouge and one of its top two leaders under Pol Pot Khieu Samphan. The movie shows archive footage of Samphan as a young man who was perceived as a good man turned bad and though he denies it was largely responsible for the murder of over 1.7 million people.


About two thirds of the 94 minute film is devoted to file footage of the history the KR movement and Samphan's role in the organization that intended to turn Cambodia into a self sufficient Agrarian society. In the process Samphan was the face and voice of the KR as Pol Pot stayed in the background and very few people really knew who he was.


Samphan is interviewed by Swedish filmmakers D. Aronowitsch and S. Lindberg who captured some real life behind the scenes footage of his family life and accompanies him in visits to his homes in Pailin and Phnom Penh. They followed him for two years before his arrest in 2007 in a search of his personality. The film gives an insight into his mindset and his close relationship with Pol Pot. From Samphan's actions and openness he comes off as a, "Charming grandfatherly figure," Seng noted after the screening.


The filmmakers questioned Samphan about 10-year-old KR soldiers killing other children. Samphan denied any knowledge of such actions. Samphan focused on the positive side of the KR ideals and sidestepped the truth.


Seng now a lawyer and human rights activist enters the film as the protagonist in helping victims of the KR revolution through her organization Center for Justice & Reconciliation. One scene shows a victim that claims when she was 8-years-old KR soldiers took her to a rice field and then proceeded to beat and rape her. She wants justice through the KR Tribunal which has been stonewalling victims and the current Cambodian government doesn't want cases 003 and 004 to be tried.


As the film progresses there are photos and video from the Khmer Rouge era as well as still photos of Seng with her family before her mother and father were murdered. Another photo shows an 8-year-old Seng with her brothers in 1979 after they fled to a refugee camp on the Thai border.


On separate occasions Seng later met Samphan and his wife. Both deny that the KR movement killed millions of people or were what the KR reputation depicts. When the meeting with Samphan's wife was proposed by the filmmakers Seng was reluctant at first but later agreed. Samphan's wife took more time to consent to the meeting. She came with her daughter putting Seng into an awkward some moments. Seng pursued some sort of admittance and apology for what the KR did to Cambodia people. The result was denial.


This film is a must see but it is doubtful that the masses will ever be able to view. Currently it's making the rounds at film festivals. There is no current plan to make the film available for purchase to the general public. Seng said she doesn't know anything about the film's future in being made available for public purchase. It's a shame as it is a must see film about the mysterious and still misunderstood events of the Khmer Rouge genocide of its people.


NOTE:


In our NR Top 10 ratings during the first quarter of 2011 show that our report on the film Red Light was popular with our readers. It's an excellent film that reveals the tragic situation in the child sex trade and an insight on why parents ell their children into the business.


This is the best film that we have seen on the subject. The problem is the like "Facing Genocide" it is not being made available for public purchase. When you see CNN banging their drum of how they're going to stamp human slavery and the trafficking of children into the sex trade you would think that these films would be made available for public purchase.


These films get it right and are being kept secret and shown only to select audiences. You would think that with public and private funding they would try to get the word out.


It's more about making films and raising money than doing something about the root cause of the problem to stamp it out. The good news is two of the best films on the sex trafficking subject Red Light and Virginity Trade will be screened at the Meta House this Friday May 20. Red Light screens at 7 PM followed by Virginity Trade at 8:30 PM.


The Meta House is located a Sothearos Boulevard # 37 Sangkat Tonle Bassic, Khan Chamkarmon, Phnom Penh.


Tel: 923-224-140 & 023 218-987


Meta House is opposite the Phnom Penh Center and Build Bright University. For more information go to: www.meta-house.com

. . . . .

Phnom Penh Post, 19 May 2011
19 May 2011. Full and other articles . . .


Joint Media Statement, 19 May 2011

Full statement . . .

 

. . . . .

 

ECCC Expenditures / Budget

20 May 2011

and KI-Media commentary

 

. . . . .

 

Appeal Against Order of Admissibility of Civil Party Application of SENG Chan Theary

18 May 2011

Redacted (by ECCC) Version


Appeal Against Order of Admissibility of Civil Party Application of SENG Chan Theary

. . . . .


Q&A with Theary C. Seng

Culled from a set of questions posed to her from foreign journalists

re Cases 003 and 004 last week, mid May 2011


Journalist 1 (“J1”): The national co-prosecutor, Chea Leang, released a statement saying that the suspects do not fall under the jurisdiction of the court as they were not senior leaders or those most responsible for crimes committed by the Khmer Rouge. Many disagree, including the international co-prosecutor. According to court documents cited in media reports, those suspects include Sou Met and Meas Mut, commanders of the KR air force and navy respectively. They have been accused of murder, torture and forced labour, among other crimes. As a historian, do you think these men fall under the category of senior leaders or those most responsible?

 

Theary C. Seng (“TS”): It is not surprising that Madam Chea Leang, a niece of Deputy Prime Minister Sok An, should re-iterate the resolute position of the Prime Minister, that there should be no more prosecutions beyond the current five detainees/indictees. Hers is a politically-influenced decision with attempts of legal rationale which doesn't pass the "laugh test". Lawyers are very good at coming up with reasons, but to be credible they must pass what one of my law professors called the "laugh test"; that is, is it credible or believable?

Read full Q&A . . .

In KI-Media

 













 

Theary's BLOG

Strawman sips Fiji, doodles, speaks fluff; BBC's Asean Way online; Anti-Sam Rainsy Law; Em Theay; "Yuon" again; Post turns 25; Canada turns 150

Now available online: The ASEAN Way: Part 1 The ASEAN Way: Part 4
The BBC Global Questions at the World Economic Forum on ASEAN had me pose the first question and gave me the last words to close the hour-long program.   ...     Why "in sp [ ... ]


Pinyin; The New Yorker Comma Queen Series; You're already appropriating punctuation marks; now use them properly

Johnson: The story of pinyin   One country, two systems
The coexistence of pinyin and Chinese characters highlights the role of emotion in language decisions   The Economist | January 2017 [excerpts]   Pinyin has not, of course, replaced the  [ ... ]


Translator

English Afrikaans Albanian Arabic Armenian Azerbaijani Basque Belarusian Bulgarian Catalan Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional) Croatian Czech Danish Dutch Estonian Filipino Finnish French Galician Georgian German Greek Haitian Creole Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Irish Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Macedonian Malay Maltese Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Romanian Russian Serbian Slovak Slovenian Spanish Swahili Swedish Thai Turkish Ukrainian Urdu Vietnamese Welsh Yiddish